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Character and interface shear strength of accreted ice on subcooled surfaces submerged in fuel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2016

J. K.-W. Lam*
Affiliation:
Airbus Operations, Filton, Bristol, Uk
L. Lao
Affiliation:
Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, UK
D. W. Hammond
Affiliation:
Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, UK
J. P. Power
Affiliation:
Airbus Operations, Filton, Bristol, UK

Abstract

Sudden release of accreted ice in fuel systems could pose a serious challenge in aircraft operation. The resultant snowshower may reach the filter and fuel-oil heat exchanger, causing a restriction in fuel flow to the engine. It is fundamental to have an appreciation of the character and the interface shear strength of the accreted ice in aircraft fuel systems. This helps to recognise factors for the sudden release of the accreted ice and the intensity of the consequential snowshower. An experimental study was carried out to quantify the character and the interface shear strength of accreted ice on subcooled surfaces submerged in jet fuel. Ice was accreted on naked aluminium, painted aluminium and carbon fibre composite surfaces at various subcooled temperatures. The accreted ice was akin to fresh snow and exhibited soft and fluffy attributes. The character may be expressed quantitatively in terms of the porosity and was found to be c. 0·95. The ice weakly adhered to the substrate surfaces, and the interface shear strength was found to be c. 0·36Pa and c. 2·19Pa at the top surface and at the vertical surface of a specimen block, respectively. It was not possible to detect any variation in the porosity and the interface shear strength for different types of surface finishes and differences in water affnity in fuels due to the crude approach in the estimation of these parameters.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 2015

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Character and interface shear strength of accreted ice on subcooled surfaces submerged in fuel
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