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Near-Surface Analysis of Semicondutor Using Grazing Incidence X-Ray Fluorescence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2019

Atsuo Iida
Affiliation:
Photon Factory, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ohomachi, Tsukubagun, Ibarakiken 305, Japan
Kenji Sakurai
Affiliation:
Department of Industrial Chemistry, University of Tokyo Bunkyoku, Tokyo 113, Japan
Yohichi Gohshi
Affiliation:
Department of Industrial Chemistry, University of Tokyo Bunkyoku, Tokyo 113, Japan
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Summary

The X-ray external total reflection was used for the x-ray fluorescence analysis of the near surface layer of a GaAs wafer and a GaAlAs epilayer. Synchrotron radiation was used as an excitation source. The intensity ratio between the Ga K and As K fluorescence signals was measured as a function of the glancing angle. The reduction of As atoms near the surface of less than a hundred Å was observed for the high temperature annealed GaAlAs epilayer.

Type
VIII. Synchrotron Radiation and Other Applications of XRF
Copyright
Copyright © International Centre for Diffraction Data 1987

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