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Accuracy assessment of a mobile terrestrial laser scanner for tree crops

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2017

F. H. S. Karp
Affiliation:
Biosystems Engineering Department, University of São Paulo. Av. Pádua Dias 11, 13418-900, Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil
A. F. Colaço
Affiliation:
Biosystems Engineering Department, University of São Paulo. Av. Pádua Dias 11, 13418-900, Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil
R. G. Trevisan
Affiliation:
Biosystems Engineering Department, University of São Paulo. Av. Pádua Dias 11, 13418-900, Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil
J. P. Molin
Affiliation:
Biosystems Engineering Department, University of São Paulo. Av. Pádua Dias 11, 13418-900, Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil
Corresponding
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Abstract

LiDAR technology is one option to collect spatial data about canopy geometry in many crops. However, the method of data acquisition includes many errors related to the LiDAR sensor, the GNSS receiver and the data acquisition set up. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the errors involved in the data acquisition from a mobile terrestrial laser scanner (MTLS). Regular shaped objects were scanned with a developed MTLS in two different tests: i) with the system mounted on a vehicle and ii) with the system mounted on a platform running over a rail. The errors of area estimation varied between 0.001 and 0.071 m2 for the circle, square and triangle objects. The errors on volume estimations were between 0.0003 and 0.0017 m3, for cylinders and truncated cone.

Type
Crop Sensors and Sensing
Copyright
© The Animal Consortium 2017 

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References

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