Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-5dv6l Total loading time: 0.32 Render date: 2021-06-16T08:07:30.848Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

A meta-analytic study of changes in brain activation in depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

P Fitzgerald
Affiliation:
Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred Monash University Department of Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Australia
J Maller
Affiliation:
Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred Monash University Department of Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Australia
K Hoy
Affiliation:
Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred Monash University Department of Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Australia
T Oxley
Affiliation:
Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred Monash University Department of Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Australia
Z Daskalakis
Affiliation:
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, College Street Site, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
A Laird
Affiliation:
Research Imaging Centre, The University of Texas Health Science Centre San Antonio, USA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstracts from ‘Brainwaves’— The Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research Annual Meeting 2006, 6–8 December, Sydney, Australia
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard

Introduction:

A large number of studies with considerably variable methods have been performed to investigate brain regions involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. The aim of this study was to use a quantitative meta-analytic technique to synthesize the results of much of this research.

Methods:

Three separate quantitative meta-analytical studies were conducted using the activation likelihood estimation technique. Analysis was performed of studies conducted at rest comparing brain activation in patients with depression and controls, studies conducted of brain changes associated with antidepressant medication treatment and studies comparing brain activation patterns induced by the induction of positive or negative emotion in patients with depression compared with controls.

Results:

The results of the study indicated a complex series of areas of the brain implicated in the pathophys-iology depression. This included a network of dorsal regions that are hypoactive in depressed subjects and increase in activity with treatment and a corresponding set of subcortical and limbic regions in which opposite changes are found.

Conclusions:

The pathophysiology of major depressive disorder involves a complicated series of networks of frontal, temporal-parietal cortical and limbic brain regions and the cerebellum. Questions remain as to whether one or other of these networks play a primary role in the etiology of the disorder.

You have Access
3
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A meta-analytic study of changes in brain activation in depression
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A meta-analytic study of changes in brain activation in depression
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A meta-analytic study of changes in brain activation in depression
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *