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To E or not to E? The case for electronic health records

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

Michael Berk*
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Barwon Health, University of Melbourne, Geelong, Victoria, Australia ORYGEN Youth Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Mental Health Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Paul Cohen
Affiliation:
Central Services, Barwon Health, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Thomas Callaly
Affiliation:
Community and Mental Health, Barwon Health, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Sue Lauder
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Barwon Health, University of Melbourne, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
*
Professor Michael Berk, Department Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Swanston Centre – Barwon Health, University of Melbourne, PO Box 281, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia. Tel: +61 3 5226 7450; Fax: +61 3 5246 5165; E-mail: mikebe@barwonhealth.org.au

Abstract

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Type
Intervention Insights
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard

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References

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Chhanabhai, P, Holt, A. Consumers are ready to accept the transition to online and electronic records if they can be assured of the security measures. GenMed 2007;9:8. Google ScholarPubMed
Valdes, I, Kibbe, DC, Tolleson, G, Kunik, ME, Petersen, LA. Barriers to proliferation of electronic medical records. Inform Prim Care 2004;12:39. Google ScholarPubMed
Middleton, B, Hammond, WE, Brennan, PF, Cooper, GF. Accelerating U.S. EHR adoption: how to get there from here. Recommendations based on the 2004 ACMI retreat. J Am Med Inform Assoc 2005;12:1319. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Baron, RJ. Quality improvement with an electronic health record: achievable, but not automatic. Ann Intern Med 2007;147:549552. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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To E or not to E? The case for electronic health records
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