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Symptom profiles of natural and laboratory panic attacks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

K R J Schruers
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology and Vijverdal Academic Anxiety Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
H van de Mortel
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology and Vijverdal Academic Anxiety Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
T Overbeek
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology and Vijverdal Academic Anxiety Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
E Griez
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology and Vijverdal Academic Anxiety Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

Little accurate information is available about the symptomatology of real-life panic attacks and about how well they are reproduced by an experimental model such as the 35% CO2 challenge.

Method:

Real-life panic symptoms were assessed in a group of 67 panic disorder patients, using daily life monitoring. Panic symptoms elicited by a 35% CO2 challenge were assessed in 61 panic disorder patients, and their frequency was compared with the real-life symptoms.

Results:

The most frequent real-life symptoms were palpitations, dizziness and trembling. The 35% CO2 challenge reproduced well the majority of real-life symptoms.

Conclusion:

The findings suggest that the 35% CO2 challenge is a marker for spontaneous panic attacks, which are considered the core of panic disorder.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Blackwell Munksgaard

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