Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-x7pwn Total loading time: 0.431 Render date: 2021-05-14T08:45:16.022Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Is CO2 inhalation a specific marker for panic disorder? An experimental panic model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2015

Summary

Patients with panic disorder (PD) report a transient feeling of anxiety upon inhalation of CO2 enriched air. They rate this experience as similar to symptoms of a panic attack. This hypersensitivity has been proposed as an experimental disease model. This paper examines the validity of single breath inhalation of 35% CO2 as a model for PD.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1.Griez, E, Lousberg, H, Hout van den, MA, Molen van der, GM. CO2 vulnerability in panic disorder. Psychiat Res 1987; 20: 8795.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2.Perna, G, Battaglia, M, Garberi, A, Arancio, C, Bertani, A, Bellodi, L. 35% CO2/65% 02 inhalation test in panic patients. Psychiat Res 1994;52:159–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.Griez, E, Zandbergen, J, Lousberg, H, Hout vd, MA. Effects of Low Pulmonary CO2 on Panic Anxiety. Compr Psychiat 1988; vol 29; 5:490–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Zandbergen, J, Lousberg, H, Pols, H, Loof de, C, Griez, E. Hyper-carbia versus Hypercarbia in Panie Disorder. J Affect Disord 1990;18:7581.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.Griez, E, Zandbergen, J, Pols, H, Loof de, C. Response to 35% Carbon Dioxide as a Marker of Panic in Severe Anxiety. Am J Psychiat 1990; 147;6:796–7.Google Scholar
6.Papp, LA, Klein, DF, Martinez, JM, Schneier, F, Cole, R, Liebowitz, MR, Hollander, E, Fyer, AJ, Jordan, F, Gorman, JM. Diagnostic and substance specificity of carbon dioxide-induced panic. Am J Psychiat 1989;146:779–81Google Scholar
7.Verburg, C, Griez, E, Meijer, J. A 35% Carbon Dioxide challenge in Simple Phobias. Acta psychiat scand 1994; 90: 420–3.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Verburg, C, Griez, E, Meijer, J. Discriminiation between panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder by 35% carbon dioxide challenge. Am Psychiat 1995;152:1081–3.Google ScholarPubMed
9.Perna, G, Barbini, B, Cochi, S, Bertani, A, Gasperini, M. 35% CO2 challenge in panic and mood disorders. J affect Disord 1995; 33:189–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.Perna, G. Cocchi, S, Bertani, A, Arancio, C, Bellodi, L. 35% CO2 sensitivity in healthy first degree relatives of patients with panic disorder. Am J Psychiat 1995; 152:623–5.Google ScholarPubMed
11.Pols, H, Zandbergen, J, de Loof, C, Griez, E. Attenuation of carbon dioxide-induced panic after clonazepam treatment. Acta psychiat scand 1991; 84:585–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12.Pols, H, Hauzer, R, Meijer, J, Verburg, K, Griez, E. Fluvoxamine attenuates panic unduced by 355 CO2 challange. J. clin Psychiat 1996; 57: 539–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Is CO2 inhalation a specific marker for panic disorder? An experimental panic model
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Is CO2 inhalation a specific marker for panic disorder? An experimental panic model
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Is CO2 inhalation a specific marker for panic disorder? An experimental panic model
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *