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Frequency of autoimmune disorders and autoantibodies in patients with neuromyelitis optica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2016

Wildéa Lice de Carvalho Jennings Pereira
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche*
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Clinical Analysis and Toxicology, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Ana Paula Kallaur
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Sayonara Rangel Oliveira
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Andréa Name Colado Simão
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Clinical Analysis and Toxicology, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Marcell Alysson Batisti Lozovoy
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Clinical Analysis and Toxicology, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Lucas José Vaz Schiavão
Affiliation:
Neurology Outpatient Department of the Outpatient Specialties of University Hospital, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Paula Raquel do Vale Pascoal Rodrigues
Affiliation:
Neurology Outpatient Department of the Outpatient Specialties of University Hospital, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Daniela Frizon Alfieri
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Tamires Flauzino
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Damacio Ramón Kaimen-Maciel
Affiliation:
Neurology Outpatient Department of the Outpatient Specialties of University Hospital, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil Department of Clinical Medicine, Health Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
*Corresponding
Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche, Department of Pathology, Clinical Analysis and Toxicology, Health Sciences Center, Londrina State University, Av. Robert Koch, 60, 86.038-350, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil. Tel: +55 43 3371 2619; Fax: +55 43 3371 2619; E-mail: reiche@sercomtel.com.br

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to report the frequency of autoimmune disorders and autoantibodies in 22 patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), as well as whether the seropositivity for autoantibodies differs between anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) positive and AQP4 negative NMO patients.

Methods

Demographic, medical records, and a profile of autoantibodies were evaluated in 22 NMO patients, including AQP4, anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-thyroperoxidase (anti-TPO), anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg), anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic, anti-cyclic citrullinate peptide, rheumatoid factor, anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, anti-Smith antibodies (anti-Sm), anti-ribonucleoprotein, anti-nucleosome, and anti-Scl70. Thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxin were measured.

Results

The frequency of women was higher than men (95.5% vs. 4.5%) and 68.2% were Afro-Brazilians. Six (27.3%) patients presented other autoimmune disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis (n=2), Graves’ disease (n=1), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis (n=1), and Raynaud’s phenomenon (n=1). The most frequent autoantibodies were anti-AQP4 (54.5%), anti-nucleosome (31.8%), ANA (27.3%), anti-TPO (22.7%), and anti-Tg (22.7%). Difference was not observed in the frequency of autoimmune disorders when the patients were compared according to their anti-AQP4 status.

Conclusion

The results of the present study underscored that the NMO patients present high frequency of autoantibodies against cellular antigens and the presence of autoimmune disorders. Further studies with large number of NMO patients may contribute to advances in the understanding of NMO disease mechanisms.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology 2016 

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