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Dimensions of improvement in a clinical trial of N-acetyl cysteine for bipolar disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

Pedro V. Magalhães
Affiliation:
National Institute for Translational Medicine, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia
Olivia M. Dean
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Ashley I. Bush
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia
David L. Copolov
Affiliation:
Office of the Vice-Chancellor & President, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Gin S. Malhi
Affiliation:
Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia CADE Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Kristy Kohlmann
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Susan Jeavons
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University – Bendigo Campus, Bendigo, Australia
Ian Schapkaitz
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia
Murray Anderson-Hunt
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia
Michael Berk
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Abstract

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Type
Comment & Critique
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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References

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