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1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy evidence for occipital involvement in treatment-naive paediatric obsessive–compulsive disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 October 2016

Maria Ljungberg*
Affiliation:
Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden
Marie K. L. Nilsson
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
Karin Melin
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Psychiatry and Habilitation, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
Lars Jönsson
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
Arvid Carlsson
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
Åsa Carlsson
Affiliation:
Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden
Eva Forssell-Aronsson
Affiliation:
Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden
Tord Ivarsson
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Psychiatry and Habilitation, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway (R-BUP), Oslo, Norway
Maria Carlsson
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
Göran Starck
Affiliation:
Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden
*Corresponding
Maria Ljungberg, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, MR Centre, Göteborg, Sweden. Tel: +46 31 342 44 55, +46 76 108 76 99; Fax: +46 31 41 16 73; E-mail: maria.ljungberg@vgregion.se

Abstract

Objective

Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder leading to considerable distress and disability. Therapies are effective in a majority of paediatric patients, however, many only get partial response. It is therefore important to study the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder.

Methods

1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study the concentration of brain metabolites in four different locations (cingulate gyrus and sulcus, occipital cortex, thalamus and right caudate nucleus). Treatment-naive children and adolescents with OCD (13 subjects) were compared with a group of healthy age- and gender-matched subjects (11 subjects). Multivariate analyses were performed on the concentration values.

Results

No separation between controls and patients was found. However, a correlation between metabolite concentrations and symptom severity as measured with the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) was found. Strongest was the correlation with the CY-BOCS obsession subscore and aspartate and choline in the caudate nucleus (positively correlated with obsessions), lipids at 2 and 0.9 ppm in thalamus, and occipital glutamate+glutamine, N-acetylaspartate and myo-inosytol (negatively correlated with obsessions).

Conclusions

The observed correlations between 1H MRS and CY-BOCS in treatment-naive patients further supports an occipital involvement in OCD. The results are consistent with our previous study on adult OCD patients. The 1H MRS data were not supportive of a separation between the patient and control groups.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology 2016 

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