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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 August 2023

Kilian Schindler
Affiliation:
Université de Fribourg, Switzerland

Summary

Type
Chapter
Information
Religious Dissimulation and Early Modern Drama
The Limits of Toleration
, pp. 238 - 268
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NC
This content is Open Access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence CC-BY-NC 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/cclicenses/

References

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