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Contributors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 September 2022

Mary S. Morgan
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Kim M. Hajek
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Dominic J. Berry
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science

Summary

Type
Chapter
Information
Narrative Science
Reasoning, Representing and Knowing since 1800
, pp. xi - xv
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022
  • LINE EDSLEV ANDERSEN is currently on maternity leave. She wrote her chapter for this volume while working as a postdoc at the Centre for Science Studies, Department of Mathematics, Aarhus University. Her main area of research is the philosophy of mathematical practice and the philosophy of science in practice.

  • JOHN BEATTY is Professor in the History and Philosophy of Science and Social and Political Philosophy at the University of British Columbia. His current research projects concern, more specifically: (1) the distinction between ‘history’ and ‘science’ and the respects in which evolutionary biology is as much like the former as it is like the latter, (2) changing views of contingency and necessity in the Darwinian Revolution, (3) the relationships between biology and ‘the state’, from the Manhattan Project to the Human Genome Project, and (4) issues concerning the nature of scientific ‘authority’.

  • DOMINIC BERRY is a Research Fellow on the Narrative Science Project. His research brings together historical, philosophical and social scientific methods and analyses attending to the biological sciences in particular. He has held research fellowships at the University of Leeds and the University of Edinburgh. In 2021, he joined ‘Everyday Cyborgs 2.0’, a Wellcome Trust-funded project based at the University of Birmingham. In 2019, he co-founded the Biological Engineering Collaboratory (www.bioengcoll.org)and in 2021 helped create the Transformational HPS network, which supports scholars who are queering, decolonizing and centring disability within HPS (www.transformationalhps.org).

  • DEBJANI BHATTACHARYYA is the Professor for the History of the Anthropocene at University Zürich. She is the author of Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta: The Making of Calcutta (Cambridge University Press, 2018). Currently, she is a non-resident fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI), University of Pennsylvania. Most recently, she was a Shelby Cullom Davis Fellow at Princeton University. Her work has been published in Modern Asian Studies, Journal of Economic and Social History of the Orient and Comparative Studies in South Asia and Africa and the Middle East.

  • SHARON L. CRASNOW is Distinguished Professor Emerita, Norco College, Southern California. Her research is on methodological issues in the social sciences with a focus on political science. She has published in Philosophy of Social Science, Philosophy of Science, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science and Synthese. She also works on feminist philosophy of science and epistemology and is co-editor (with Kristen Intemann) of The Routledge Handbook of Feminist Philosophy of Science (2021).

  • STEPHANIE DICK is an assistant professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University. She holds a PhD in history of science from Harvard University. She is a historian of mathematics, computing and artificial intelligence in the twentieth-century United States. In particular, she studies the early introduction of computing and automation to American mathematics and to American policing during the Cold War.

  • LUKAS ENGELMANN is a Chancellor’s Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the History and Sociology of Biomedicine at the University of Edinburgh. His research concerned with the history of epidemiological reasoning in the twentieth century received an ERC Starting Grant in 2020. His first book, Mapping AIDS, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2018 and considers the visual and medical history of AIDS/HIV. In 2020, he published a co-authored monograph on sulphuric utopias, with Christos Lynteris (open access), which tells the technological history of fumigation and the political history of maritime sanitation at the turn of the twentieth century.

  • DEVIN GRIFFITHS is an associate professor of English and comparative literature at the University of Southern California. His first book, The Age of Analogy: Science and Literature between the Darwins, explores how analogy helped shape the disciplinary formations of the life sciences and humanities. With Deanna Kreisel, he is co-editor of a forthcoming Cambridge University Press collection on the influence of Darwin’s thinking on the humanities, entitled After Darwin. He is currently working on a new book, The Ecology of Power, that explores, from the perspective of the energy humanities, the historical intersection of ecological and economic theory.

  • ELIZABETH HAINES is Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow in History at the University of Bristol. Her research applies interdisciplinary approaches to the lived practices of knowledge-making, particularly in colonial and postcolonial contexts. She has a particular interest in visual and material culture as tools within knowledge practices. Recent research collaborations include work with physical scientists, NGOs, heritage and art practitioners in the UK, Kenya, Zambia, Belgium and the United States. She is currently completing a monograph, Illegible Territory, that explores the use and disuse of geographical knowledge by the colonial government in Northern Rhodesia, developed from her doctoral and post-doctoral research.

  • KIM M. HAJEK was a postdoctoral researcher on the Narrative Science Project at the LSE, and currently works at the University of Leiden in the ‘Scholarly Vices Project’. She is affiliated with the Institut des humanités en médecine, Lausanne, and serves as Associate Editor for Centaurus and on the editorial board of Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences. Kim’s research spans history of science and literary studies, focusing on how textual practices inform knowledge-making in the human sciences. Her publications explore ideas of normality and case-writing in nineteenth-century French psychology, as well as science/literature intersections in the history of hypnotism.

  • ANDREW HOPKINS is an Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at University College London. He also served as a Research Officer on the Narrative Science Project at the London School of Economics. A former industrial geoscientist and science educator, he is currently active in the field of history and philosophy of science, with a particular interest in understanding what enables historical sciences such as geology to reconstruct the deep past. He has a PhD in marine geology and geophysics and is a Fellow of the Geological Society of London.

  • BRIAN HURWITZ is Emeritus Professor of Medicine and the Arts at King’s College London. He worked as an inner-city general practitioner and academic for thirty years, becoming Professor of Primary Care and General Practice at Imperial College London. In 2002, he moved to King’s to set up the Centre for the Humanities and Health, a multidisciplinary research unit that also offers Master’s, PhD and postdoctoral education for students of the humanities, biosciences and health professionals. Based in the English Department, his research interests include narrative studies in relation to clinical practice, ethics, law and the epistemic aspects of clinical cases.

  • JOHN E. HUSS is professor of philosophy at the University of Akron, where he is also on the faculty of the Integrated Bioscience PhD program and a member of the Biomimicry Research and Innovation Center. His research interests include philosophy of science, philosophy of medicine, applied ethics and philosophy of popular culture.

  • ELSPETH JAJDELSKA is a senior lecturer in English at the University of Strathclyde. She researches the cognitive experience of narrative fiction as well as the history of reading experience. She has published on cognition of literary fiction in Poetics Today, Journal of Literary Semantics, Philosophical Psychology and Frontiers in Psychology. Her monograph, Speech, Print and Decorum in Britain, 1600–1750, uses anthropological theories of verbal art and performance to explain historical changes in reading experience. She is currently working on a project on the relationship between internal scene construction and narrative experience.

  • NINA KRANKE studied environmental sciences and philosophy in Lüneburg and Greifswald, Germany. She started her PhD project at the University of Kassel and is now a research assistant at the Department of Philosophy at the University of Münster and a member of the interdisciplinary DFG Research Training Group 2220 ‘Evolutionary Processes in Adaptation and Disease’ (EvoPAD). Her research interests include philosophy of science, philosophy of biology, feminist philosophy, bioethics and animal ethics.

  • ROBERT MEUNIER is research fellow at the Institute for the History of Medicine and Science Studies at the University of Lübeck, Germany, and part of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation’. In 2012, he graduated from the PhD programme, ‘Foundations of the Life Sciences and their Ethical Consequences’, jointly hosted by the University of Milan and the European School of Molecular Medicine. Since then, he worked at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, the Institute for Cultural Inquiry Berlin, the Department of History, LMU Munich, the Department of Philosophy, University of Kassel, and the ERC-funded Narrative Science Project at the London School of Economics. From 2018 to 2021 he was Principal Investigator in the DFG-funded research project, ‘Forms of Practice, Forms of Knowledge’, located at the University of Kassel.

  • TERU MIYAKE is an associate professor and head of the philosophy programme at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, and a former Fellow of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. His research has centred on epistemological issues in the physical sciences, particularly planetary astronomy, seismology and late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century experimental physics. He has also written on measurement, the use of models in science, scientific realism and nineteenth-century British philosophy of science.

  • MARY S. MORGAN is the Albert O. Hirschman Professor of History and Philosophy of Economics at the London School of Economics, an elected Fellow of the British Academy and an Overseas Fellow of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has published on social scientists’ practices of modelling, observing, measuring and making case studies, and is especially interested in how ideas, numbers and facts are used in projects designed to change the world. Her most recent books are How Well Do Facts Travel? (2011) and The World in the Model (2012), both published by Cambridge University Press.

  • PAULA OLMOS is an associate professor of logic and philosophy of science at Madrid’s Autonomous University. Her research interests cover argumentation theory and rhetoric, focusing especially on argumentation in science. She has published papers on these subjects in journals including Argumentation, Informal Logic and Revista Iberoamericana de Argumentación, and in several collective volumes of Springer’s ‘Argumentation Series’. She has acted as co-editor of reference works including Compendio de lógica, Argumentación y retórica (2011, 2012, 2013, 2016) and De la demostración a la argumentación (2015), and has coordinated and edited the volume of essays Narration as Argument (2017).

  • MAT PASKINS works for a charity and has a PhD in the history of science. They have written about the relations between the history of science and voluntary associations, the role of tree-planting in British politics and notions of improvement and histories of chemistry and material sciences. Mat is also interested in relations between science and literature and has co-edited two anthologies of narrative science.

  • ANNE TEATHER is an archaeologist who specializes in the material culture of the Neolithic period (5000–2000 bce) in northern Europe. She is Managing Director of Past Participate CIC, a non-profit community archaeology company that provides high-quality archaeological excavation and research training. She is a visiting fellow at Bournemouth University and publishes regularly on prehistoric art and archaeological theory. She taught as a fixed-term lecturer at the University of Chester (2007–12) and is currently writing a monograph, Power from the Periphery, an account of the role of material culture in prehistoric societies.

  • M. NORTON WISE is Distinguished Research Professor (Emeritus) in the Department of History at UCLA and has published widely in the history of the physical sciences in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His most recent book is Aesthetics, Industry, and Science: Hermann von Helmholtz and the Berlin Physical Society. He has also published a variety of articles on narrative in science, especially concerning the role of computer simulations and visual narratives. With Mary Morgan, he has edited a special issue of Studies in History and Philosophy of Science on narratives in science.

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  • Contributors
  • Edited by Mary S. Morgan, London School of Economics and Political Science, Kim M. Hajek, London School of Economics and Political Science, Dominic J. Berry, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: Narrative Science
  • Online publication: 16 September 2022
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  • Contributors
  • Edited by Mary S. Morgan, London School of Economics and Political Science, Kim M. Hajek, London School of Economics and Political Science, Dominic J. Berry, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: Narrative Science
  • Online publication: 16 September 2022
Available formats
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  • Contributors
  • Edited by Mary S. Morgan, London School of Economics and Political Science, Kim M. Hajek, London School of Economics and Political Science, Dominic J. Berry, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: Narrative Science
  • Online publication: 16 September 2022
Available formats
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