Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
  • Access
  • Print publication year: 2020
  • Online publication date: December 2019

Introduction

  • View HTML
    • Send chapter to Kindle

      To send this chapter to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      • Introduction
      • Katie M. Hemphill, University of Arizona
      • Book: Bawdy City
      • Online publication: 06 December 2019
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108773669.001
      Available formats
      ×

      Send chapter to Dropbox

      To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      • Introduction
      • Katie M. Hemphill, University of Arizona
      • Book: Bawdy City
      • Online publication: 06 December 2019
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108773669.001
      Available formats
      ×

      Send chapter to Google Drive

      To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      • Introduction
      • Katie M. Hemphill, University of Arizona
      • Book: Bawdy City
      • Online publication: 06 December 2019
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108773669.001
      Available formats
      ×

Summary

In 1846, Baltimore entrepreneur Johns Hopkins opened a “splendid” set of commercial buildings on the corner of Lombard and Gay Streets, just north of the Patapsco River. Hopkins, who made his fortune first as a country merchant and then as an investor in the railroad, intended the buildings to facilitate the trade that was central to both Baltimore’s economy and his personal wealth. The buildings were practical, but they were also a symbol of the city’s commercial pretensions. In addition to offices and commodious warehouses where merchants and dry goods dealers could keep the variety of products they imported from the countryside and exported through the port of Baltimore, Hopkins funded the construction of a beautifully designed corner hall. The three-story structure, described as one of the “handsomest buildings in the city,” was adorned with numerous ornaments, including a trident of Neptune and a Roman spade that symbolized Baltimore’s links to maritime commerce and agriculture.

Related content

Powered by UNSILO