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III - Publics and empires

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2018

Helen Anne Curry
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Nicholas Jardine
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
James Andrew Secord
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Emma C. Spary
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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