Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-54jdg Total loading time: 0.402 Render date: 2022-08-16T02:48:20.790Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

9 - Getting by

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Pete Alcock
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
Christina Beatty
Affiliation:
Sheffield Hallam University
Stephen Fothergill
Affiliation:
Sheffield Hallam University
Rob MacMillan
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Sue Yeandle
Affiliation:
Sheffield Hallam University
Rob Macmillan
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Get access

Summary

Introduction

For most working-age people, earnings constitute the ‘norm’ in terms of making ends meet. This is sometimes supplemented by other sources of income, but individuals and households largely ‘get by’ through earnings from work. Whole societies and economies are arguably predicated on this norm, which has had immense symbolic significance (Bauman 1998) even if it tends to downplay or overlook the role of unpaid work such as domestic labour, unpaid care and voluntary work (Levitas 1998).

For the Labour government in the UK, for example, employment has become a central plank of both economic and social policy. Commentators increasingly refer to an ‘employment-centred’ social policy based on the promotion of work and the work ethic (Jordan 1998, Annesley 2001: 202–18), encapsulated in the now familiar refrain regarding the focus on ‘work for those who can, security for those who cannot’ (Department of Social Security 1998a: iii). Not only does the focus on employment and employability have important economic consequences, it is also suggested to be the most effective ‘escape route’ from low incomes and social exclusion.

In attempting to make employment-centred social policy a reality, policies regarding income maintenance for those of working age have focused upon the introduction and development of a range of in-work benefits. New tax credits for working families, for child care costs, and for employment have been introduced or are in development.

Type
Chapter
Information
Work to Welfare
How Men Become Detached from the Labour Market
, pp. 206 - 227
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×