Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-89n48 Total loading time: 0.333 Render date: 2022-12-08T01:02:09.120Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 5 - Women/‘women’ and the stage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Helen Wilcox
Affiliation:
Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands
Get access

Summary

‘I will wear the breeches, so I will.’

(William Hawkins, Apollo Shroving 1.i. 194–8)

It seems appropriate to begin this chapter on theatrical matters with a prologue – in fact two prologues – the first taken from a relatively obscure play, William Hawkins's Apollo Shroving, an example of the academic drama written for scholars at Hadleigh School, Suffolk, and performed by them on Shrove Tuesday, 6 February 1626. In what Hawkins calls the ‘Introduction’, the male speaker of the prologue is interrupted by a female spectator called Lala (addressed as ‘Mistress Lala, Spinster’, or ‘Dame Lall’) who objects to his use of Latin words and classical names, fearing that she will not be able to follow the play if it is in Latin. At the end of the first scene she leaves, somewhat mollified, with this exit speech:

Well, I see now it will be English. It shall go hard but I'll get a part amongst them. I'll into the tiring house, and scamble and wrangle for a man's part. Why should not women act men, as well as boys act women? I will wear the breeches, so I will.

(1.i.194—8)
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×