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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2011

Philippe Cullet
Affiliation:
University of London
Philippe Cullet
Affiliation:
School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
Alix Gowlland-Gualtieri
Affiliation:
School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
Roopa Madhav
Affiliation:
School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
Usha Ramanathan
Affiliation:
School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
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Summary

Water law in India has experienced significant changes over the past few years and is still evolving. These changes have an internal and an external dimension. On the one hand, water law grew over time into a relatively amorphous set of laws, principles, rules and judicial decisions. The lack of clear direction given, for instance, by an overall water legislation, setting principles governing all water in all its uses, explains in part the relative lack of clarity that water law exhibited. The need to give more clarity to this regulatory framework together with the changing situation in the water sector in general called for reforms. On the other hand, there has been a growing push among international institutions over the past two decades for water sector reforms and water law reforms in many countries. International water policy making has been very influential and a great number of developing countries have adopted reforms that closely follow the model proposed at the international level. The level of compliance with the set of principles propounded by international agencies can be partly ascribed to the fact that lending institutions, such as the World Bank, have strongly endorsed these principles and included them as part of their lending instruments. Since lending institutions such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank have been quite active in India and have included a number of law reform conditionality in their loans, a number of ongoing reforms in India are directly linked to international principles.

Type
Chapter
Information
Water Governance in Motion
Towards Socially and Environmentally Sustainable Water Laws
, pp. 1 - 8
Publisher: Foundation Books
Print publication year: 2010

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  • Introduction
  • Edited by Philippe Cullet, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Alix Gowlland-Gualtieri, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Roopa Madhav, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Usha Ramanathan, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
  • Book: Water Governance in Motion
  • Online publication: 26 October 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9788175968578.001
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  • Introduction
  • Edited by Philippe Cullet, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Alix Gowlland-Gualtieri, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Roopa Madhav, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Usha Ramanathan, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
  • Book: Water Governance in Motion
  • Online publication: 26 October 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9788175968578.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Edited by Philippe Cullet, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Alix Gowlland-Gualtieri, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Roopa Madhav, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London, Usha Ramanathan, School of Oriental and African Studeis, University of London
  • Book: Water Governance in Motion
  • Online publication: 26 October 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9788175968578.001
Available formats
×