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Chapter 5 - Homo Religiosus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 January 2020

David McPherson
Affiliation:
Creighton University, Omaha
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Summary

I explore the place of spirituality within a neo-Aristotelian ethical perspective. Among neo-Aristotelians this issue is often either ignored or excluded from consideration. I discuss why this is and also why it is problematic. More positively, I suggest how spirituality can play an important role in a neo-Aristotelian account of “the good life.” By “spirituality” I mean a practical life-orientation that is shaped by what is taken to be a self-transcending source of meaning, which involves strong normative demands, including demands of the sacred or the reverence-worthy. I argue that through an exploration of the strong evaluative standpoint from within our human form of life as meaning-seeking animals we can come to appreciate better the importance of spirituality for human beings throughout recorded history and why we can be described as homo religiosus. In addition, I argue against the anti-contemplative stance of many neo-Aristotelians and for the integral importance of contemplation for human life, and for the spiritual life in particular. I also discuss the draw of theistic spirituality, even though my account allows for both theistic and non-theistic forms of spirituality.

Type
Chapter
Information
Virtue and Meaning
A Neo-Aristotelian Perspective
, pp. 150 - 193
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Homo Religiosus
  • David McPherson, Creighton University, Omaha
  • Book: Virtue and Meaning
  • Online publication: 09 January 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108775151.006
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  • Homo Religiosus
  • David McPherson, Creighton University, Omaha
  • Book: Virtue and Meaning
  • Online publication: 09 January 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108775151.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Homo Religiosus
  • David McPherson, Creighton University, Omaha
  • Book: Virtue and Meaning
  • Online publication: 09 January 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108775151.006
Available formats
×