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4 - The Conditions for the Beginning of Virtue Simpliciter

from Part II - The Conditions of Virtue Simpliciter

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Justin M. Anderson
Affiliation:
Seton Hall University, New Jersey
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Summary

The themes of grace and nature were in a phase of development even in the years preceding Thomas Aquinas. This was, in part, due to the innovations within and between speculative frameworks involving the categories of both nature and the supernatural. These developments both were Aquinas’s inheritance and would become the subject of his own innovations. Scholars of Aquinas’s writings throughout the centuries, including Bouillard, Lonergan, and Wawrykow, have gestured toward systematic developments in Aquinas’s theology of grace. While each of these voices has made use of Thomas’s transformations for his own purpose, I have found no study throughout this history that traces the impacts of these shifts on Aquinas’s account of virtue. This is a major aspect of our challenge. Both the dynamic situation occurring in the mid-thirteenth century, combined with Aquinas’s own textual discoveries in the early 1260s, moved his theology of grace in such a manner that one can worthily examine his account of God’s grace for clues to how he understood virtue to act in our moral lives.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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