Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7c2ld Total loading time: 0.823 Render date: 2021-12-07T08:02:31.032Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

Environmental Effects in Star-Forming Dwarf Galaxies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2010

G. Tenorio-Tagle
Affiliation:
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Tenerife
J. M. Vilchez
Affiliation:
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
Get access

Summary

I present here some preliminary results of a study of the spectroscopic properties of a group of star-forming dwarf galaxies that have been selected in order to sample the range in physical conditions imposed by extreme density environments. This investigation is part of an ongoing project intended to evaluate the relative influences of the environment, and the initial conditions, on the evolution of galaxies with active star formation. It has been found that, on average, starforming dwarf galaxies located in nearby low density regions appear to present spectra with higher excitation, higher Hβ equivalent widths and larger total Hβ luminosities than similar objects located within high-density environments.

Introduction

The influence of the environment on the mechanisms that control star formation is one of the most important subjects concerning the study of the origin and evolution of galaxies. Spiral galaxies in clusters, a high-density environment, have been used to trace the present-day star formation rate (SFR) in order to compare with field galaxies. Some studies of spirals in clusters suggest a reduced SFR with respect to field galaxies of the same morphological type, while others tend to favour a similar or higher SFR in cluster spirals; this question still remains open (Moss & Whittle, 1993). Current environmental effects which can be operating in galaxies as a consequence of the interaction with companions and with the intergalactic medium include, among others, tidal shaking, tidal stripping, ram pressure sweeping and evaporation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Violent Star Formation
From 30 Doradus to QSOs
, pp. 214 - 219
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×