Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-m42fx Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-22T02:07:16.334Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

5 - The treasure of the translator: Dante and Brunetto

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Alison Cornish
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Get access

Summary

In a treatise entitled ‘Fruits of the Tongue’, which grows out of what he admits is almost entirely a translation taken from ‘Guglielmo di Frencia’ (William Peraldus, Summa de vitiis), Domenico Cavalca describes preachers who want only to show off to educated audiences as ‘adulterers of the word’:

And if they do preach, they do not want to preach except to a great people, and to honourable and literate persons, to show off their knowledge more than to teach the way of God. These, as St Paul says, are adulterers of the word of God in that, as Saint Gregory says, they do not scatter the seed of the word of God to engender spiritual sons of God, but to have temporal glory or gain for themselves.

These show-off preachers are also described as those ‘great literary men without conscience’ who are the ‘worst men in the world’ (‘gli peggiori uomini del mondo sono li grandi letterati senza coscienza’). Although it is important for men to have sufficient knowledge in order to teach others, Cavalca reminds his reader that Augustine says that many saints were perfect in the desert, however unlearned (‘quantunque idioti’). The enterprise of vernacularization, of which the Frutti are a part, is for the benefit of the unlearned, as Cavalca often repeats: ‘I as a simple person speak in the vernacular to simple and unlearned men’ (‘io come semplice parlo in volgare per uomini semplici ed idioti’).

Type
Chapter
Information
Vernacular Translation in Dante's Italy
Illiterate Literature
, pp. 126 - 157
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×