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2 - Conceptual Scheme

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2020

Michael Coppedge
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
John Gerring
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Adam Glynn
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
Carl Henrik Knutsen
Affiliation:
Universitetet i Oslo
Staffan I. Lindberg
Affiliation:
Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
Daniel Pemstein
Affiliation:
North Dakota State University
Brigitte Seim
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Svend-Erik Skaaning
Affiliation:
Aarhus Universitet, Denmark
Jan Teorell
Affiliation:
Lunds Universitet, Sweden
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Summary

This chapter sets forth the conceptual scheme for the V–Dem project. We begin by discussing the concept of democracy. Next, we lay out seven principles by which this key concept may be understood – electoral, liberal, majoritarian, consensual, participatory, deliberative, and egalitarian. Each defines a “variety“ of democracy, and together they offer a fairly comprehensive accounting of the concept as used in the world today. Next, we show how this seven-part framework fits into our overall thinking about democracy, including multiple levels of disaggregation – to components, subcomponents, and indicators. The final section of the chapter discusses several important caveats and clarifications pertaining to this ambitious taxonomic exercise.

Type
Chapter
Information
Varieties of Democracy
Measuring Two Centuries of Political Change
, pp. 27 - 42
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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