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11 - Pre-test assessment using questionnaires

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Ramandeep Basra
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust
Nikki Cotterill
Affiliation:
Bristol Urological Institute
Swati Jha
Affiliation:
Royal Hallamshire Hospital
Conrnelius J Kelleher
Affiliation:
St Thomas' Hospital
Stephen Radley
Affiliation:
Royal Hallamshire Hospital
Ranee Thakar
Affiliation:
St George’s University of London
Philip Toosz-Hobson
Affiliation:
Birmingham Women’s Hospital
Lucia Dolan
Affiliation:
Belfast City Hospital
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Summary

Why use quality of life questionnaires?

Lower urinary tract symptoms cause significant health-related quality of life impairment for sufferers. In clinical practice, a physician's assessment of the disease burden is inaccurate and non-reproducible and physicians often underestimate the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on patients' quality of life. Patients report higher subjective distress in questionnaires than structured interviews. To optimise the management of symptoms, it is important that their impact is assessed in a meaningful manner.

Lower urinary tract symptoms and their impact can be measured in several ways; however, the only validated way of measuring the patient's perspective is through the use of psychometrically robust self-completion questionnaires. Questionnaires should only be used if they provide a valid, reproducible, rapid assessment of patient-reported disease impact, which can elicit symptom impact and which is also useful for the evaluation of treatment efficacy.

The King's Health Questionnaire

Features

The King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) is a condition-specific, self-completion questionnaire (Table 11.1). It was developed and validated following six pilot studies. These studies demonstrated good validity and reliability. The KHQ has been extensively used in pharmaceutical clinical studies.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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