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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2021

Wallace Arthur
Affiliation:
National University of Ireland, Galway
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Understanding Evo-Devo , pp. 173 - 181
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • References
  • Wallace Arthur, National University of Ireland, Galway
  • Book: Understanding Evo-Devo
  • Online publication: 29 April 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108873130.014
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  • References
  • Wallace Arthur, National University of Ireland, Galway
  • Book: Understanding Evo-Devo
  • Online publication: 29 April 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108873130.014
Available formats
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • References
  • Wallace Arthur, National University of Ireland, Galway
  • Book: Understanding Evo-Devo
  • Online publication: 29 April 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108873130.014
Available formats
×