Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 1.011 Render date: 2021-12-07T13:54:05.161Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

13 - Latin America

(Still) a Site of Persecution and an (Evolving) Global Defender of the Persecuted

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2018

Daniel Philpott
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
Timothy Samuel Shah
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Get access

Summary

Latin America is undergoing dramatic religious transformation but maintains healthy indices of religious freedom. [paragraph break] Activist Christians were persecuted by military regimes from the 1960s to 1980s. A new style of regime collided with the new Catholic emphasis on human rights. In response, strategies included episcopal denunciations, documentation of outrages, international solidarity, a human-rights discourse, and (very occasionally) armed resistance. [paragraph break] The main contemporary case-studies are Cuba, Colombia and Mexico. Cuba represents a residual case of Marxist-inspired opposition to religion, in process of morphing into one-party regime concern with pre-empting challenges to its rule. Colombia’s insurgency- and drug-fuelled violence clashes with a strong grassroots clerical presence to make it very dangerous for Catholic pastoral workers (at least until the 2016 peace agreement). In Mexico, an intransigent Catholic culture co-exists with a laïciste state tradition. Violence against Protestant converts occurs in indigenous areas; and violence against Catholic pastoral workers prevails wherever organized crime runs rampant. [paragraph break] Brazil illustrates attempts to mobilize regional countries in global defence of religious freedom. Such attempts have suffered from a narrow ideological and confessional base. Globally, responses to persecution should take more account of geopolitics, especially by straddling ideological divides and internationalizing the defence of IRF.
Type
Chapter
Information
Under Caesar's Sword
How Christians Respond to Persecution
, pp. 391 - 427
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×