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Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 October 2020

Mashal Saif
Affiliation:
Clemson University, South Carolina
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Summary

It was early November 2011, the day before the festival of ‘Id al-Adha, and I was seated in the reception area of Jami‘a Nizamiyya,1 one of the largest Barelawi seminaries in Lahore.2 Across from me sat Rashid Nizami,3 the president of the seminary. Nizami was born in 1971 into a family of religious scholars. After completing the eight-year dars-i nizami course, Nizami graduated with two master’s degrees from Punjab University, a leading public university in the country. One of Nizami’s master’s was in economics, the other in Arabic and Islamic studies. Following the sudden death of his father, the previous president of Jami‘a Nizamiyya, Rashid Nizami assumed the leadership of the seminary in the late 2000s.

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The 'Ulama in Contemporary Pakistan
Contesting and Cultivating an Islamic Republic
, pp. 279 - 290
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Conclusion
  • Mashal Saif, Clemson University, South Carolina
  • Book: The <I>'Ulama</I> in Contemporary Pakistan
  • Online publication: 20 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108885034.007
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Conclusion
  • Mashal Saif, Clemson University, South Carolina
  • Book: The <I>'Ulama</I> in Contemporary Pakistan
  • Online publication: 20 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108885034.007
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Mashal Saif, Clemson University, South Carolina
  • Book: The <I>'Ulama</I> in Contemporary Pakistan
  • Online publication: 20 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108885034.007
Available formats
×