Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 1.179 Render date: 2021-12-03T10:32:54.221Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

4 - Self-Report Tests

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2021

Adrian Furnham
Affiliation:
University of London
Get access

Summary

This long chapter covers three very well-known ways of selection. The first is the interview, which is used almost universally as well as expected by candidates. The chapter looks at different types of interviews, especially the difference between structured and unstructured interviews. It also considers problems of impression management as well as the role of the personality of interviewers. Developments in automated/digital interviews is reviewed. The second section considers the very big topic of personality tests and focuses on bright- and dark-side tests as well as attempts to measure ‘high-flyers’. It also looks at the measurement of integrity, motivation and strengths. Whilst there have been many developments in how tests are delivered (i.e. through mobile phones), there has been much less progress in theory development. One aim is to help the reader make better decisions on the choice of the thousands of tests available. Thirdly, the literature on projective techniques is reviewed, including the famous Thematic Apperception test, and sentence completion. Whilst the appeal of these tests is great, the evidence for their validity is weak.

Type
Chapter
Information
Twenty Ways to Assess Personnel
Different Techniques and their Respective Advantages
, pp. 115 - 206
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Basch, J., & Melchers, K. (2019). Fair and flexible?! Explanations can improve applicant reactions toward asynchronous video interviews. Personnel Assessment and Decisions, 3, 111.Google Scholar
Horn, R., & Behrend, T. (2017). Video killed the interview star. Personnel Assessment and Decisions, 1, 5159.Google Scholar
Melchers, K., Ingold, P., Wilhelmy, A., Kleinmann, M. (2015). Beyond validity: Shedding light on the social situation in employment interviews. In Nikolaou, & Osstrom, J (Eds.), Employee Recruitment, Selection and Assessment (pp. 154–171). London: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Roulin, N., Bourdage, J., & Wingate, T. (2019). Who is conducting “better” employment interviews. Personnel Assessment and Decisions, 1, 3748.Google Scholar
Al-Dajani, N., Gralnick, T., & Bagby, R. (2016). A psychometric review of the personality inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Journal of Personality Assessment, 98, 62–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed. rev.). Washington, DC: APA.Google Scholar
American Psychological Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. (4th ed. rev.). Washington, DC: APA.Google Scholar
Ashton, M. C., & Lee, K. (2007). Empirical, theoretical, and practical advantages of the HEXACO model of personality structure. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 11, 150166. https://doi.org/10.1177/1088868306294907CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Babiak, P., & Hare, R. (2006). Snakes in suits: When psychopaths go to work. New York: Regan Books.Google Scholar
Bagby, R. M. (2013) Introduction to special issue on the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID 5). Assessment, 20, 267268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barkoukis, V., Lazuras, L., Tsorbatzoudis, H., & Rodafinos, A. (2011). Motivational and sportspersonship profiles of elite athletes in relation to doping behavior. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 12(3), 205212. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2010.10.003CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Basch, J., & Melchers, K. (2019). Fair and flexible?! Explanations can improve applicant reactions toward asynchronous video interviews. Personnel Assessment and Decisions, 3, 111.Google Scholar
Bastiaansen, L., Rossi, G., & De Fruyt, F. (2012). Comparing five sets of Five-Factor model personality disorder counts in a heterogeneous sample of psychiatric patients. European Journal of Personality, 2, 377388.Google Scholar
Bastiaansen, L., Rossi, G., Schotte, C., & De Fruyt, F. (2011). The structure of personality disorders. Journal of Personality Disorders, 25, 378396.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Benson, M. J., & Campbell, J. P. (2007). To be, or not to be, linear: An expanded representation of personality and its relationship to leadership performance. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 15(2), 232249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blashfield, R., Keeley, J., Flanagan, E., & Miles, S. (2014). The cycle of classification: DSM-1 through DSM-5. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 10, 2551.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bryant, F. B., & Yarnold, P. R. (1995). Principal components analysis and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. In Grimm, L. G. & Yarnold, R. R. (Eds.), Reading and understanding multivariable statistics (pp. 99136). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Cable, D. M., & Edwards, J. R. (2004). Complementary and supplementary fit: A theoretical and empirical integration. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89(5), 822834. https://doi.org/10.1037/0021-9010.89.5.822CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carroll, B. (1973). Job satisfaction: A review of the literature. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University.Google Scholar
Carver, C. S. & Schier, M. F. (1992) Perspectives on Personality. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
Cattell, R. B. (1978). The Scientific Use of Factor Analysis. New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, J., Hepworth, S., Wall, T., & Warr, P. (1981). The experience of work. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Coolidge, F. (2001). Short Form of the Coolidge Axis-II inventory (SCATI). Colorado Springs, CO: Manual.Google Scholar
Coolidge, F. L., Segal, D. L., Cahill, B. S., & Simenson, J. T. (2010). Psychometric properties of a brief inventory for the screening of personality disorders: The SCATI. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 83(4), 395405.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Costa, P.T., & McCrae, R. (1985). The NEO personality inventory manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.Google Scholar
Costa, P. T., & McCrae, R. R. (1992). Four ways five factors are basic. Personality and Individual Differences, 13, 653665.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cotton, L., Bynum, D., & Madhere, S. (1997). Socialization forces and the stability of work values from late adolescence to early adulthood. Psychological Reports, 80(1), 115124. https://doi.org/10.2466/pr0.1997.80.1.115CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cronbach, L. J., & Shavelson, R. J. (2004). My current thoughts on coefficient alpha and successor procedures. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 64(3), 391418.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davison, M., & Furnham, A. (2018). The personality disorder profile of professional actors. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 7, 3346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Fruyt, F., De Clercq, B., Milley, J., Rolland, J. P., Jung, S. C., Taris, R., Furnham, A., & Hiel, A. (2009). Assessing personality at risk in personnel selection and development. European Journal of Personality, 23, 5169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deci, E. L., Koestner, R., & Ryan, R. M. (1999). A meta-analytic review of experiments examining the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 125(6), 627668. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.125.6.627CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (1985). Self-determination and intrinsic motivation in human behavior. New York: Plenum Publishing Co.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Digman, J. M. (1997). Higher-order factors of the Big Five. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73, 1246.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eysenck, H. J. (1967). The biological basis of personality. Springfield: Thomas.Google Scholar
Eysenck, H. J. (1970). A dimensional system of psychodiagnostics. In Mahrer, A. R. (Ed.), New approaches to personality classification and psychodiagnosis (pp. 169208). New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Faul, F., Erdfelder, E., Lang, A.-G., & Buchner, A. (2007). G*Power 3: A flexible statistical power analysis program for the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences. Behavior Research Methods, 39(2), 175191. https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03193146CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Floyd, F. J., & Whidaman, K. F. (1995). Factor analysis in the development and refinement of clinical assessment instruments. Psychological Assessment, i(3), 286299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A. (2008). Personality and intelligence at work. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A. (2010). The elephant in the boardroom: The psychology of leadership derailment. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A. (2015). Bringing order and reason to the personality disorders. PsycCRITIQUES, 60, 14.Google Scholar
Furnham, A. (2018). A Big Five facet analysis of sub-clinical Dependent Personality Disorder (Dutifulness). Psychiatry Research, 270, 622626.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A. (2019). The Personality Disorders and Money Beliefs and Behaviours. Financial Planning Review, 2, e1046.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2005). Personality traits, types and disorders. European Journal of Personality, 19, 167184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2013). A bright side, facet analysis of Schizotypal Personality Disorder. The relationship between the HDS Imaginative Factor, the NEO-PI-R personality trait facets in a large adult sample. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 11, 4247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2014a). A bright side facet analysis of Histrionic Personality Disorder: The relationship between the HDS Colourful Factor and the NEO-PI-R facets in a large adult sample. Journal of Social Psychology, 154, 527536.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2014b). A bright side facet analysis of Borderline Personality Disorder: The relationship between the HDS Excitable Factor and the NEO-PI-R facets in a large adult sample. Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotional Dysregulation, 1, 17.Google Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2014c). A Big Five facet analysis of sub-clinical Narcissism: Understanding Boldness in terms of well-known personality traits. Personality and Mental Health, 8, 209217.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2015). A Big Five facet analysis of a Paranoid personality disorder: The Validity of the HDS Sceptical scale of sub-clinical Paranoia. Journal of Individual Differences, 36, 199204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2015). Personality and management traits: traits that differentiate leadership levels. Psychology, 6, 549559.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2016a). A Big Five facet analysis of a psychopath: The Validity of the HDS Mischievous scale of sub-clinical Psychopathy. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 57, 117121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Furnham, A., & Crump, J. (2016b). Personality correlates of passive-aggressiveness: A NEO-PI-R domain and facet analysis of the HDS leisurely scale. Journal of Mental Health, 6, 496501.Google Scholar
Furnham, A., & Lester, D. (2012). The development of a short measure of character strength. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 28, 95101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Macrae, I. (2019). The dark side of work values. Current Psychology, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144–018-9873-zCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Trickey, G. (2011). Sex differences and dark side traits. Personality and Individual Differences, 50, 517522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Crump, J., & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2007). Managerial level, personality, and intelligence. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 22, 805818.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Eracleous, A., & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2009). Personality, motivation and job satisfaction: Herzberg meets the Big Five. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 24(8), 765779. https://doi.org/10.1108/02683940910996789CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Forde, L., & Ferrari, K. (1999). Personality and work motivation. Personality and Individual Differences, 26(6), 10351040. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0191–8869(98)00202-5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Guenole, N., Levine, S., & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2013). The NEO Personality Inventory-Revised. Assessment, 20, 1423.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Furnham, A., Humphries, C., & Zheng, E. (2016). Can successful sales people become successful managers? Differences in Derailers and Motives across two jobs. Consulting Journal: Practice and Research, 68, 252268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Hyde, G., & Trickey, G. (2014). Do your dark side traits fit? Dysfunctional personalities in different work sectors. Applied Psychology, 63(4), 589606.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Milner, R., Akhtar, R., & De Fruyt, F. (2014). A review of the measures designed to assess DSMV personality disorders. Psychology, 5, 16461686.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Petrides, K.V., Jackson, C., & Cotter, T. (2002). Do personality factors predict job satisfaction? Personality and Individual Differences, 33(8), 13251342. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0191–8869(02)00016-8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Petrides, K. V., Tsaousis, I., Pappas, K., & Garrod, D. (2005). A cross cultural investigation into the relationships between personality traits and work values. Journal of Psychology, 139(1), 532. https://doi.org/10.3200/JRLP.139.1.5-32CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Furnham, A., Richards, S. C., & Paulhus, D. L. (2013). The dark triad of personality: A 10-year review. Social and Personality Compass, 7, 199216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Richards, S., Rangle, L., & Jones, D. (2014). Measuring malevolence: Quantitative issues surrounding the dark triad of personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 67, 114121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Trickey, G., & Hyde, G. (2012). Bright aspects to dark side traits: Dark side traits associated with work success. Personality and Individual Differences, 52(8), 908913.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Crump, J., & Ritchie, W. (2013). What it takes: Ability, demographic, bright and dark side trait correlates of years to promotion. Personality and Individual Differences, 55, 952956.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gagné, M., & Vansteenkiste, M. (2013). Self determination theory’s contribution to positive organizational psychology. In Bakker, A. B. (Ed.), Advances in positive organizational psychology (pp. 6182). Rotterdam: Erasmus University. https://doi.org/10.1108/S2046–410X(2013)0000001006CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gagné, M., Forest, J., Gilbert, M. H., Aubé, C., Morin, E., & Malorni, A. (2010). The Motivation at Work Scale: Validation evidence in two languages. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 70(4), 628646. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013164409355698CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gagné, M., Forest, J., Vansteenkiste, M., Crevier-Braud, L., Van den Broeck, A., Aspeli, A., & Halvari, H. (2015). The multidimensional work motivation scale: Validation evidence in seven languages and nine countries. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 24(2), 178196. https://doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2013.877892CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Georgel, J. M., & Jones, G. R. (1997). Experiencing work: Values, attitudes, and moods. Human Relations, 50(4), 393416. https://doi.org/10.1177/001872679705000404CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gosling, S. D., Rentfrow, P. J., & Swann, W. B., Jr. (2003). A Very Brief Measure of the Big Five Personality Domains. Journal of Research in Personality, 37, 504528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gøtzsche-Astrup, O., Jakobsen, J., & Furnham, A. ( 2016 ). The higher you climb: dark side personality and job level in a sample of executives, middle managers, and entry-level supervisors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 57, 535541.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hare, R. D. (1999). Without conscience: The disturbing word of the psychopaths among us. New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Harms, P., Spain, S., & Hannah, S. (2011) Leader development and the dark side of personality. Leadership Quarterly, 22, 495509.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hauber, F. A., & Bruininks, R. H. (1986). Intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction among direct-care staff in residential facilities for mentally retarded people. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 46(1), 95105. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013164486461009CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hedman, E., Ljótsson, B., Rück, C., Furmark, T., Carlbring, P., Lindefors, N., & Andersson, G. (2010). Internet administration of self-report measures commonly used in research on social anxiety disorder: A psychometric evaluation. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(4), 736740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herzberg, F. (1966). Work and the nature of man. Cleveland, OH: World Publishers.Google Scholar
Herzberg, F., Mausner, B., & Snyderman, B. (1959). The motivation to work. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Hogan, R. (1986). Hogan Personality Inventory manual. Minneapolis: National Computer Systems.Google Scholar
Hogan, R. (2007). Personality and the fate of organizations. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Hogan, J., & Hogan, R. (1997). Motives, values, preferences inventory manual. Tulsa, OK: Hogan Assessment Systems.Google Scholar
Hogan, R. & Hogan, J. (2001). Assessing leadership: A view from the dark side. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 9, 4051.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hogan, R., & Hogan, J. (2009). Hogan Development Survey manual (3rd ed.). Tulsa, OK: Hogan Assessment Systems.Google Scholar
Hogan, R., & Hogan, J. (2009). Hogan Development Survey Manual. Tulsa, OK: HAS.Google Scholar
Hogan, R. & Hogan, J. (2009). Hogan development survey manual. Tulsa, OK: HAS.Google Scholar
Hogan, J., Hogan, R., & Kaiser, R.B. (2010). Management derailment. In Zedeck, S. (Ed.), APA handbook of industrial and organizational psychology (Vol. 3, pp. 555575). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Hogan, R., Hogan, J., & Roberts, B. W. (1996). Personality measurement and employment decisions: Questions and answers. American Psychologist, 51, 469477.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hogan, R., & Kaiser, R.B. (2005). What we know about leadership. Journal of General Psychology, 9, 169180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hooper, D., Coughlan, J., & Mullen, M. R. (2008). Structural equation modelling: Guidelines for determining model fit. Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods, 6(1), 5360. Retrieved from https://maynoothuniversity.ieGoogle Scholar
Horn, R., & Behrend, T. (2017). Video killed the interview star. Personnel Assessment and Decisions, 1, 5159.Google Scholar
Hu, L. T., & Bentler, P. M. (1999). Cutoff criteria for fit indexes in covariance structure analysis: Conventional criteria versus new alternatives. Structural Equation Modeling: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 6(1), 155. https://doi.org/10.1080/10705519909540118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huprich, S. K. (Ed.). (2015). Personality Disorders: Toward theoretical and empirical integration in diagnosis and assessment. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Igalens, J., & Roussel, P. (1999). A study of the relationships between compensation package, work motivation and job satisfaction. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 20(7), 10031025. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-1379(199912)20:7<1003::AID-JOB941>3.0.CO;2-K3.0.CO;2-K>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jopp, A., & South, S. (2014). Investing the personality inventory for DSM-5 using self and spouse reports. Journal of Personality Disorders, 28, 122.Google Scholar
Judge, T. A., Bono, J. E., Ilies, R., & Gerhardt, M. W. (2002). Personality and leadership: A qualitative and quantitative review. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, 765780.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Judge, T. A., Heller, D., & Mount, M. K. (2002). Five-factor model of personality and job satisfaction: A meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(3), 530541.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Judge, T., & LePine, J. (2007). The bright and dark sides of personality. In Langan-Fox, J., Cooper, C., & Klimoski, R. (Eds.), Research companion to the dysfunctional workplace (pp. 332355). Cheltham: Elgar.Google Scholar
Kaiser, R. B., LeBreton, J. M., & Hogan, J. (2015). The dark side of personality and extreme leader behavior. Applied Psychology, 64(1), 5592.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kerr, S., Harlan, A., & Stogdill, R. M. (1974). Preference for motivator and hygiene factors in a hypothetical interview situation. Personnel Psychology, 27(1), 109124. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6570.1974.tb02067.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knoop, R. (1994a). Work values and job satisfaction. Journal of Psychology, 128(6), 683690. https://doi.org/10.1080/00223980.1994.9921297CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knoop, R. (1994c). The relationship between importance and achievement of work values and job satisfaction. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 79(1), 595605. https://doi.org/10.2466/pms.1994.79.1.595CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kohn, A. (1993) Punished by Rewards. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
Krueger, R.F., & Markon, K. E. (2014). The role of the DSM-5 personality trait model in moving toward a quantitative and empirically based approach to classifying personality and psychopathology. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 10, 477501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Latham, G. P., & Pinder, C. C. (2005). Work motivation theory and research at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Annual Review of Psychology, 56, 485516. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.psych.55.090902.142105CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lepper, M. R., & Greene, D. (1975). Turning play into work: Effects of adult surveillance and extrinsic rewards on children’s intrinsic motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 31(3), 479486. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0076484CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Locke, E. (1976). The nature and causes of job satisfaction. In Dunnette, M. (Ed.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology. Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
Lönnqvist, J. E., Paunonen, S., Nissinen, V., Ortju, K., & Verkasalo, M. (2011). Selfenhancement in military leaders: Its relevance to officer selection and performance. Applied Psychology, 60(4), 670695.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacRae, I., & Furnham, A. (2014). High Potential: How to spot manage and develop talented people at work. Bloomsbury: London.Google Scholar
MacRae, I., & Furnham, A. (2017). Motivation and performance: A guide to motivating a diverse workforce. London: Kogan Page.Google Scholar
MacRae, I., & Furnham, A. (2020). Psychometric Analysis of the High Potential Trait Inventory (HPTI). Psychology, 11(8), 1125–1140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCall, M. W. (1997). High-Flyers: Developing the next generation of leaders. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School.Google Scholar
McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. (1996). Toward a new generation of personality theories: Theoretical contexts for the five-factor model. In Wiggins, J. S. (Ed.), The five factor model of personality: Theoretical perspectives (pp. 5187). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
McCrae, R. R., & Terracciano, A. (2005). Universal features of personality traits from the observer’s perspective: Data from 50 cultures. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 547561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Melchers, K., Ingold, P., Wilhelmy, A., Kleinmann, M. (2015). Beyond validity: Shedding light on the social situation in employment interviews. In Nikolaou, & Osstrom, J (Eds.), Employee Recruitment, Selection and Assessment (pp. 154171). London: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Miller, L. (2008). From Difficult to Disturbed. New York: AMACOM.Google Scholar
Miller, J. D., Campbell, W. K., & Pilkonis, P. A. (2007). Narcissistic personality disorder: Relations with distress and functional impairment. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 48(2), 170177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moscoso, S., & Salgado, J. F. (2004). ‘Dark side’ personality styles as predictors of task, contextual, and job performance. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 12(4), 356362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Musek, J. (2007). A general factor of personality: Evidence for the Big One in the five-factor model. Journal of Research in Personality, 41, 12131233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Netter, P. (1997). Digging forward into the past: Modern research on the neurochemical basis of individual differences rooted in Hans Eysenck’s theory. ISSID Conference, Giessen, July.Google Scholar
Nord, W., Brief, A., Atieh, J., & Doherty, E. (1990). Studying meanings of work: The case of work values. In Brief, A. and Nord, W. (Eds.), Meanings of occupational work (pp. 2164). Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
O’Boyle, E. H., Forsyth, D. R., Banks, G. C., & McDaniel, M. A. (2012). A metaanalysis of the dark triad and work behavior: A social exchange perspective. Journal of Applied Psychology, 97(3), 557.Google Scholar
Oldham, J., & Morris, L. (1991). Personality self-portrait. New York: Bantam.Google Scholar
Overhuin, M., & Furnham, A. (2012). Assessing Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD): A review of self-report measures. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 1, 312324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Palaiou, K., & Furnham, A. (2014). Are bosses unique? Personality facet differences between CEOs and staff in five work sectors. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 66, 173196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parks, L., & Guay, R. P. (2009). Personality, values, and motivation. Personality and Individual Differences, 47(7), 675684. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2009.06.002CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paulhus, D. L. (1991). Measurement and control of response bias. In Robinson, J. P., Shaver, P. R., & Wrightsman, L. S. (Eds.), Measures of personality and social psychological attitudes (pp. 1759). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paulhus, D. L. (2002). Socially desirable responding: The evolution of a construct. In Braun, H. I., Jackson, D. N., & Wiley, D. E. (Eds.), The role of constructs in psychological and educational measurement (pp. 4969). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Paulhus, D. L., & Jones, D. N. (2014). Measures of dark personalities. In Boyle, G. J., Saklofske, D. H., & Mathews, G. (Eds.), Measures of personality and social psychological constructs (pp. 562594). San Diego: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Pink, D. H. (2009). Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. New York: Riverhead BooksGoogle Scholar
Rauthmann, J. F. (2012). The Dark Triad and interpersonal perception: Similarities and differences in the social consequences of narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 3(4), 487496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Resnick, C., Whitman, D., Weingarden, S., & Hiller, N. (2009). The bright-side and the dark-side of CEO personality. Journal of Applied Psychology, 94, 13651381. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0016238CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rice, R., Gentile, D., & McFarlin, D. (1991). Facet importance and job satisfaction. Journal of Applied Psychology, 76(1), 3139. https://doi.org/10.1037/0021-9010.76.1.31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roulin, N., Bourdage, J., & Wingate, T. (2019). Who is conducting “better” employment interviews. Personnel Assessment and Decisions, 1, 3748.Google Scholar
Samuel, D.B., & Widiger, T.A. (2008). A meta-analytic review of the relationships between the Five-Factor Model and DSM-IV-TR personality disorders: A facet level analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 28, 13261342.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Saulsman, L., & Page, A. (2004). The five factor model and personality disorder empirical literature: A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 10551085.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schwartz, S. H. (1992). Universals in the content and structure of values: Theory and empirical tests in 20 countries. In Zanna, M. (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 25, pp. 165). New York.Google Scholar
Schwartz, S. H. (1994). Are there universal aspects in the content and structure of values? Journal of Social Issues, 23, 1430.Google Scholar
Schwartz, S. H. (1996). Value priorities and behavior: Applying a theory of integrated value systems. In Seligman, C., Olson, J. M., & Zanna, M. P. (Eds.), The psychology of values: The Ontario Symposium (Vol. 8, pp. 124). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Skodol, A., Bender, S., Morey, L., Clark, L., Oldham, J., Alarcon, R., Krueger, R., Verheul, R., Bell, C., & Siever, L. (2011). Personality disorder types proposed for DSM-5. Journal of Personality Disorders, 25, 136169.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Skodol, A. E., Oldham, J. M., Bender, D. S., Dyck, I. R., Stout, R. L., Morey, L. C., Shea, M.T., Zanarini, M.C., Sanislow, C.A., Grilo, C.M., McGlashan, T.H., & Gunderson, J.G. (2005). Dimensional representations of DSM-IV personality disorders: relationships to functional impairment. American Journal of Psychiatry, 162(10), 19191925.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, S. F., & Lilienfeld, S. O. (2013). Psychopathy in the workplace: The knowns and unknowns. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 18(2), 204218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spain, S. M., Harms, P., & LeBreton, J. M. (2014). The dark side of personality at work. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35, 4160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steiger, J. H. (2000). Point estimation, hypothesis testing, and interval estimation using the RMSEA: Some comments and a reply to Hayduk and Glaser. Structural Equation Modelling, 7(2), 149162. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15328007SEM0702_1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Super, D. E. (1970). Work values inventory. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
Teodorescu, A., Furnham, A., & MacRae, I. (2017). Trait correlates of success at work. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 25(1), 3642.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swami, V., Weis, L., Lay, A., Barron, D., & Furnham, A. (2016). Associations between belief in conspiracy theories and the maladaptive personality traits of the personality inventory for DSM-5. Psychiatry Research, 236, 8690.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Kampen, D., De Beurs, E., & Andrea, H. (2008). A short form of the dimensional assessment of personality pathology (DAPP-BQ): The DAPP-SF. Psychiatry Research, 160:115128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Leeuwen, K. G., Mervielde, I., De Clerco, B. J., & De Fruyt, F. (2007). Extending the spectrum idea: Child personality, parenting and psychopathology. European Journal of Personality, 21(1), 6389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waters, L. L., & Waters, C. W. (1972). An empirical test of five versions of twofactor theory of job satisfaction. Organizational Behaviour and Human Performance, 7(1), 1824.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wernimont, R. (1966). Intrinsic and extrinsic factors in job satisfaction. Journal of Applied Psychology, 50(1), 4150.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Widiger, T. (2011). Integrating normal and abnormal personality structure: A proposal for DSM-V. Journal of Personality Disorders, 25, 338363.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Widiger, T. A, Gore, W. L., Crego, C., Rojas, S. L., & Oltmanns, J. R. (2017). Five factor model and personality disorder. In Widiger, T. A. (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of the five factor model (pp. 449478). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Widiger, T. A., & Costa, P. T., Jr. (2002). Five-factor model personality disorder research. In Costa, P. T., Jr. & Widiger, T. A. (Eds.), Personality disorders and the five-factor model of personality (pp. 5987). American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Widiger, T. A., Trull, T. J., Clarkin, J. F., Sanderson, C. & Costa, P. T. (2002). A description of the DSM-IV personality disorders with the five-factor model of personality. In Costa, P. T. & Widiger, T. A. (Eds.), Personality disorders and the five factor model of personality (2nd ed., pp. 8999). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Widiger, T., & Costa, P. (1994). Personality and personality disorders. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 7891.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Winsborough, D. L., & Sambath, V. (2013). Not like us: An investigation into the personalities of New Zealand CEOs. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 65, 87107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wissing, B., & Reinhard, M.-A. (2017). The dark triad and the PID-5 maladaptive personality traits. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, article 1549.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wright, A., & Simms, L. J. (2014). On the structure of personality disorder traits: Conjoint analysis of the CAT-PD, PID-5, and NEO PI-3 trait models. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 5, 43–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Binet, A. (1895). Measuring visual illusions in children. Philosophical Review of France and Abroad, 40, 1125.Google Scholar
Garb, H. N., Wood, J. M., Lilienfeld, S. O., & Nezworski, M. T. (2005). Roots of the Rorschach controversy. Clinical Psychology Review, 25(1), 97118.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lilienfeld, S. O., Wood, J. M., & Garb, H. N. (2000). The scientific status of projective techniques. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 1(2), 2766.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McClelland, D. C. (1999). How the test lives on: Extensions of the thematic apperception test approach. In Gieser, L. & Stein, M. I. (Eds.), Evocative images: The thematic apperception test and the art of projection (pp. 163175). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, J. M., Lilienfeld, S. O., Nezworski, M. T., Garb, H. N., Allen, K. H., & Wildermuth, J. L. (2010). Validity of Rorschach Inkblot scores for discriminating psychopaths from nonpsychopaths in forensic populations: A meta-analysis. Psychological Assessment, 22(2), 336.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Self-Report Tests
  • Adrian Furnham, University of London
  • Book: Twenty Ways to Assess Personnel
  • Online publication: 11 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108953276.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Self-Report Tests
  • Adrian Furnham, University of London
  • Book: Twenty Ways to Assess Personnel
  • Online publication: 11 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108953276.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Self-Report Tests
  • Adrian Furnham, University of London
  • Book: Twenty Ways to Assess Personnel
  • Online publication: 11 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108953276.005
Available formats
×