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Section III - Iatrogenic ischemic strokes: other causes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 October 2016

Alexander Tsiskaridze
Affiliation:
Sarajishvili Institute of Neurology, Tblisi State University, Georgia
Arne Lindgren
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Lund, Sweden
Adnan I. Qureshi
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota
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Treatment-Related Stroke
Including Iatrogenic and In-Hospital Strokes
, pp. 113 - 154
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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