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Chapter 12 - Session 7: The Drowsies

from Part II - A Session-by-Session Guide to Feeling and Body Investigators

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2023

Nancy L. Zucker
Affiliation:
Duke University Medical Center, Durham
Katharine L. Loeb
Affiliation:
Chicago Center for Evidence Based Treatment
Martha E. Gagliano
Affiliation:
Duke University Medical Center, Durham
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Summary

The Drowsies is our session about sleep. As a restful night of sleep is an important part of any pain management routine, we wanted to devote a session just to that. We explore that sensations that make it hard to get into bed (e.g., Stuck Stephanie – the feeling that you can’t stop doing something that you like doing (like playing video games) to do something you would rather not do (like get ready for bed). We remember some old friends that that may make it hard to fall asleep like Mind-Racing Mikella and Betty Butterfly and we investigate all the sensations that may contribute to a wonderful and cozy night of rest. Cozy Celeste, Sleepy Steven, Cool Cyrus, and Stretched-Out Comfy Cayla are some sensations we explore this session. Wait till you try out all of our different bedtime routines!

Type
Chapter
Information
Treating Functional Abdominal Pain in Children
A Clinical Guide Using Feeling and Body Investigators (FBI)
, pp. 106 - 115
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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