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Chapter 24 - Principles of Rehabilitation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2020

Peter C. Whitfield
Affiliation:
Derriford Hospital, Plymouth
Jessie Welbourne
Affiliation:
University Hospitals, Plymouth
Elfyn Thomas
Affiliation:
Derriford Hospital, Plymouth
Fiona Summers
Affiliation:
Aberdeen Royal Infirmary
Maggie Whyte
Affiliation:
Aberdeen Royal Infirmary
Peter J. Hutchinson
Affiliation:
Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge
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Summary

Rehabilitation has been defined in many ways, but in the broadest sense is concerned with maximising quality of life after injury or illness.1 More specifically, rehabilitation is about maximising the ability and opportunity of the person with brain injury to participate in those activities of daily living, work, education, leisure and relationships that are valued by that person. Wade discusses the importance of models of illness (and health) and highlights the value of the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework for understanding the process of rehabilitation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Traumatic Brain Injury
A Multidisciplinary Approach
, pp. 301 - 307
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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