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Chapter 6 - Translating the Greeks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2022

Jan Steyn
Affiliation:
University of Iowa
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Summary

This chapter traces key moments and motifs in the history of the translation of Greek texts primarily into English. It highlights how Greek translation becomes paradigmatic for translation tout court, informing both translation rhetoric and practice, and then tackles the model cases of Homer and Sappho, the former diachronically, the latter synchronically through several case studies from the first half of the twentieth century. It homes in on modernist writers’ particular understanding of translation as poised between critical scholarship and creative practice in order to argue that poets such as H.D. or Ezra Pound evade or even subvert existing modes of conceptualizing both ‘Greece’ and translation, thus opening the way for the plethora of approaches that characterize Greek translation today. The chapter concludes with a cautionary note as it examines the programmatic resistance to Greek translation displayed by Virginia Woolf and Yorgos Seferis.

Type
Chapter
Information
Translation
Crafts, Contexts, Consequences
, pp. 82 - 111
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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