Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-9th95 Total loading time: 0.33 Render date: 2022-12-02T13:59:40.741Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Foreword: on the transition to hydrogen

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2011

Alexander Wokaun
Affiliation:
Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland
Erik Wilhelm
Affiliation:
Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland
Get access

Summary

The transition to a sustainable energy supply is one of the major challenges that humans will face during the twenty-first century. This transition is inevitable, but there are many scenarios discussed for how and when this will happen. Humans have relied on renewable energy for most of history, and will do so again, as affordable supplies of fossil fuels decline in the coming decades (or centuries). However, there is wide agreement that the world should not give up the benefits of modern technology. The transition to a ‘green’ energy supply has already begun, and technologies for collecting and converting energy from the environment, new means of energy storage, and increased energy efficiency have progressed greatly. That is why there is legitimate hope that the coming change will be possible without a major reduction in the quality of life.

Individual mobility and long-distance travel have become vital elements of human existence. This mobility and the freedom it enables are taken for granted by most, and even considered a fundamental right. Most of this mobility is provided by the more than 900 million motor vehicles that now populate roads around the globe. An enormous number – and expected to grow to more than 1.1 billion in less than a decade. If all the motor vehicles on the globe were put bumper to bumper, the resulting giant traffic jam would be 4.5 million kilometres long, or wrap around the globe more than 100 times.

Type
Chapter
Information
Transition to Hydrogen
Pathways Toward Clean Transportation
, pp. x - xii
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×