Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-4nk8m Total loading time: 0.318 Render date: 2021-10-17T06:24:02.872Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

9 - Developments in Word Learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

Lois Bloom
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Get access

Summary

Infants start out with certain broad capacities for speech, and learning to say words depends on maturation of these capacities: both maturation of the anatomy for speech and maturation of the sensorimotor connections between audition and production systems. Learning to say words also depends on hearing other persons say words; a child has to hear their sounds and appreciate how the sounds that are heard relate to sounds the child can say. Infants begin to take account of the speech they hear and to bend their own capacities for soundmaking to accommodate the sounds of speech in the first half year of life. Before the first words appear, the influence of hearing such different languages as French, English, Japanese, and Swedish is already evident in differences in the sounds of babbling. But maturation and phonetic input determine which words are learned and how they are learned only in a social and informational context. It is the personal and interpersonal context that determines which words are learned in the second year.

EARLY VOCABULARIES

A critically important question for studies of the emergence of language is What is a word? Deciding that what a child says qualifies as a word depends on judgments about the sounds emitted in the effort and their relevance to what is going on in the context. The criteria we used to judge that a word was a word were intuitive and similar to those used in other studies: relatively consistent phonetic shape and meaningfulness.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Transition from Infancy to Language
Acquiring the Power of Expression
, pp. 188 - 213
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1993

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Developments in Word Learning
  • Lois Bloom, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: The Transition from Infancy to Language
  • Online publication: 04 August 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511752797.010
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Developments in Word Learning
  • Lois Bloom, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: The Transition from Infancy to Language
  • Online publication: 04 August 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511752797.010
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Developments in Word Learning
  • Lois Bloom, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: The Transition from Infancy to Language
  • Online publication: 04 August 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511752797.010
Available formats
×