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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 January 2010

John A. J. Barbara
Affiliation:
Emeritus Consultant in Microbiology to NHS Blood and Transplant; Visiting Professor in Transfusion Microbiology, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Fiona A. M. Regan
Affiliation:
NHSBT and Hammersmith Hospitals, NHS Trust, London, UK
Marcela C. Contreras
Affiliation:
Royal Free and University College Hospitals, Medical School, London, UK; Formerly Director of Diagnostics, Development and Research National Blood Service, UK
John A. J. Barbara
Affiliation:
University of the West of England, Bristol
Fiona A. M. Regan
Affiliation:
HNSBT and Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, London
Marcela Contreras
Affiliation:
University of the West of England, Bristol
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Summary

Prior to the early 1970s infections transmitted by transfusion were relatively common. In developed countries the introduction of routine screening for hepatitis B virus infection marked the beginning of the recognition, and implementation of systematic measures to reduce the risk from transmission, of viruses by blood transfusion. Currently, extensive measures are taken in many countries to ensure that blood transfusion poses a minimal microbiological hazard to recipients. Continual refinements to donor selection criteria, microbiological testing, technologies, processes such as leucodepletion, viral inactivation and associated quality management systems seek to improve the safety even further, yet there is a diminishing safety yield for ever escalating costs with each new intervention. In less affluent countries, the level of risk from transfusion-transmitted infections is often undetermined and there is a chronic insufficiency of blood donors. The few donors available may well be non-voluntary and this adds to the potential risk from transfusion infections. Fortunately, progress is being made in several regions in establishing voluntary, non-remunerated, blood donor panels. So what does the future hold in the field of transfusion microbiology?

Inevitably, ‘new’ infectious agents will emerge that are potentially pathogenic, which will have to be assessed in terms of the degree of risk to recipients of blood. The way in which these risks are addressed will continue to evolve. Available options for prevention of transmission will have to be assessed not only in terms of efficacy but also in terms of cost-effectiveness and, in many countries, prioritized against other demands for health care resources.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Preface
    • By John A. J. Barbara, Emeritus Consultant in Microbiology to NHS Blood and Transplant; Visiting Professor in Transfusion Microbiology, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK, Fiona A. M. Regan, NHSBT and Hammersmith Hospitals, NHS Trust, London, UK, Marcela C. Contreras, Royal Free and University College Hospitals, Medical School, London, UK; Formerly Director of Diagnostics, Development and Research National Blood Service, UK
  • Edited by John A. J. Barbara, University of the West of England, Bristol, Fiona A. M. Regan, Marcela Contreras, University of the West of England, Bristol
  • Book: Transfusion Microbiology
  • Online publication: 12 January 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545245.002
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  • Preface
    • By John A. J. Barbara, Emeritus Consultant in Microbiology to NHS Blood and Transplant; Visiting Professor in Transfusion Microbiology, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK, Fiona A. M. Regan, NHSBT and Hammersmith Hospitals, NHS Trust, London, UK, Marcela C. Contreras, Royal Free and University College Hospitals, Medical School, London, UK; Formerly Director of Diagnostics, Development and Research National Blood Service, UK
  • Edited by John A. J. Barbara, University of the West of England, Bristol, Fiona A. M. Regan, Marcela Contreras, University of the West of England, Bristol
  • Book: Transfusion Microbiology
  • Online publication: 12 January 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545245.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
    • By John A. J. Barbara, Emeritus Consultant in Microbiology to NHS Blood and Transplant; Visiting Professor in Transfusion Microbiology, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK, Fiona A. M. Regan, NHSBT and Hammersmith Hospitals, NHS Trust, London, UK, Marcela C. Contreras, Royal Free and University College Hospitals, Medical School, London, UK; Formerly Director of Diagnostics, Development and Research National Blood Service, UK
  • Edited by John A. J. Barbara, University of the West of England, Bristol, Fiona A. M. Regan, Marcela Contreras, University of the West of England, Bristol
  • Book: Transfusion Microbiology
  • Online publication: 12 January 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545245.002
Available formats
×