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Chapter Eleven - The Turquoise Corridor

Mesoamerican Prestige Technologies and Social Complexity in the Greater Southwest

from Part III - The Role of Political Economy and Elite Control in Long-Distance Exchange

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 August 2022

Johan Ling
Affiliation:
University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Richard Chacon
Affiliation:
Winhrop University, South Carolina
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Summary

Diagnostics of low-impact foreign intrusions … would include the presence of significant quantities of all defined categories of artifacts, architecture, and iconography. Artifacts, both foreign imports and locally made copies, as well as foreign symbols rendered in a local style should be found in elite and non-elite contexts.

Type
Chapter
Information
Trade before Civilization
Long Distance Exchange and the Rise of Social Complexity
, pp. 251 - 286
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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