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Chapter Two - Funnel Beaker Societies and Long-Distance Trade

from Part I - Exchange and Social Evolution: Forms of Trade in Egalitarian, Transegalitarian, and Chiefdom Societies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 August 2022

Johan Ling
Affiliation:
University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Richard Chacon
Affiliation:
Winhrop University, South Carolina
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Summary

In many European regions, neolithization processes are linked with ritual economies that include the construction of megalithic monuments. As paleo-environmental and archaeological archives of the North Central European and South Scandinavian Funnel Beaker societies have proven to be excellent, the reconstruction of social processes linked with the introduction of horti- and agriculture and with the construction of first monuments displays a well-researched example for the investigation of long-distance contacts. It becomes obvious that long-distance contacts of these societies indicate different purposes in different stages of their economic and social development.

Type
Chapter
Information
Trade before Civilization
Long Distance Exchange and the Rise of Social Complexity
, pp. 23 - 39
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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