Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-54vk6 Total loading time: 0.507 Render date: 2022-08-13T02:58:07.220Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

4 - “The Economics of Universal Education” and After: From Friedman to Rawls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2019

David M. Levy
Affiliation:
George Mason University, Virginia
Sandra J. Peart
Affiliation:
University of Richmond
Get access

Summary

Buchanan’s and Nutter’s 1959 “Economics of Universal Education” has generated intense controversy. Their analysis of education financed through a voucher system is read as offering Virginia racists a method to resist the integration mandated by the Supreme Court. Their comparison of a public school system to majority rule and a voucher system to proportional representation provides some context to the controversy. The Knightian background explains why, in the 1965 republication of their essay, they deemed segregated schools to be ineligible for state support. Buchanan returned to the context of the inequality of racial outcomes in which he adopted a Rawlsian notion of the “fair chance” to which all individuals are entitled. He formulated a social contract in which the randomness of market outcomes is accepted in exchange for being judged on competence. Buchanan argued for a government policy of quotas in hiring so that individuals might prove their competence. In line with this reasoning, Buchanan also renounced his previous support of a voucher system for education.

Type
Chapter
Information
Towards an Economics of Natural Equals
A Documentary History of the Early Virginia School
, pp. 93 - 138
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×