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Part III - Borderline Personality and Eating Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2020

Christian Tewes
Affiliation:
Heidelberg University Hospital
Giovanni Stanghellini
Affiliation:
Chieti University
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Time and Body
Phenomenological and Psychopathological Approaches
, pp. 175 - 286
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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