Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.555 Render date: 2021-12-03T17:40:01.267Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2012

Douglas M. Gibler
Affiliation:
University of Alabama
Get access

Summary

Introduction

India and Pakistan were long-time colonies of Great Britain. In 1947, British rule ended and the territories of the empire were partitioned into the Union of India and the Dominion of Pakistan based largely on the religious characteristics of the population in the territories. While most Muslim territories were quickly incorporated into Pakistan, the maharajah of Kashmir, Hari Singh, hesitated instead of joining the new state, even though his territory was 77 percent Muslim. Pakistani forces immediately tried to force the maharajah into accession with guerrilla violence. Singh then appealed to Louis Mountbatten, the last viceroy of India for the British, and he agreed to assist, so long as the Kashmiri territory became part of India. Singh agreed, and Indian forces pushed the Pakistani irregulars from the area (Stein and Arnold 2010). The war that followed lasted into the next year and claimed thousands of lives. Unresolved, the dispute recurred multiple times, resulting in deadly wars between Pakistan and India in 1965 and 1999. They fought a related war in 1971, and China and India actually fought over territory in the area in 1962. The sensitivity of the region is one reason why the floodlights along the border can be seen from space at night, as the photo on the book jacket shows.

Why does it really matter to both India and Pakistan which state Kashmir joined in 1947? The land itself, though breathtakingly beautiful, provides little in the way of resources or raw materials for manufacturing.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Territorial Peace
Borders, State Development, and International Conflict
, pp. 1 - 6
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Introduction
  • Douglas M. Gibler, University of Alabama
  • Book: The Territorial Peace
  • Online publication: 05 October 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139060233.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • Douglas M. Gibler, University of Alabama
  • Book: The Territorial Peace
  • Online publication: 05 October 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139060233.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Douglas M. Gibler, University of Alabama
  • Book: The Territorial Peace
  • Online publication: 05 October 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139060233.001
Available formats
×