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Case 4 - A 50-Year-Old Woman with Prior DVT Undergoing Hysterectomy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Todd R. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Lisa Keder
Affiliation:
Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus
Abimola Famuyide
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Kimberly S. Gecsi
Affiliation:
Medical College of Wisconsin
David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
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Summary

A 50-year-old, gravida 1, para 1, with prior deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presents for a preoperative visit due to upcoming hysterectomy. She is scheduled for a total abdominal hysterectomy due to abnormal uterine bleeding and uterine fibroids. The patient’s medical history is significant for obesity and prior history of DVT. Her DVT occurred 10 years ago and was unprovoked. She completed a course of anticoagulation with warfarin for three months. She takes aspirin 81 mg a day. She has no family history of thromboembolic disease. She does not smoke. She is sexually active with one female partner. She has had one prior cesarean section and one vaginal delivery.

Type
Chapter
Information
Surgical Gynecology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 9 - 11
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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