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Case 3 - A 45-Year-Old Woman with Possible Penicillin Allergy Scheduled for Hysterectomy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Todd R. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Lisa Keder
Affiliation:
Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus
Abimola Famuyide
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Kimberly S. Gecsi
Affiliation:
Medical College of Wisconsin
David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
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Summary

A 45-year-old presents for a preoperative visit. She reports regular menses that have become increasingly heavy in the past year and have not improved with hormonal management. Three weeks ago, she received a transfusion in the emergency department where imaging was notable for uterine fibroids. She received counseling on treatment options and desires hysterectomy. Her history is remarkable for two full-term vaginal deliveries. She has no history of abnormal cervical cytology or sexually transmitted diseases. Her past medical history is significant for exercise-induced asthma and surgical history for tonsillectomy. She is currently taking combined oral contraceptives, multivitamins, iron, and calcium with vitamin D. She is a non-smoker, does not drink alcohol, and is sexually active with one female partner. She reports a penicillin allergy characterized by the development of hives during prior treatment for a urinary tract infection 10 years ago.

Type
Chapter
Information
Surgical Gynecology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 6 - 8
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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