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Case 2 - A 40-Year-Old G0 Developmentally Delayed Woman Requires Hysterectomy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Todd R. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Lisa Keder
Affiliation:
Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus
Abimola Famuyide
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Kimberly S. Gecsi
Affiliation:
Medical College of Wisconsin
David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
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Summary

A 40-year-old nulligravid woman with developmental disabilities presents to the office with her mother. She is being followed for a long-standing history of heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain. She had previously been treated with depot medroxyprogesterone acetate but had persistent light bleeding that presented hygiene issues. Her past medical history is significant for hypertension and constipation. She has never had abdominal or pelvic surgery. She has never been sexually active. She is not employed. She lives with her mother who is her caregiver.

Type
Chapter
Information
Surgical Gynecology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 4 - 5
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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