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Case 52 - A 35-Year-Old G0 Woman with Chronic Pain and Multiple Prior Surgeries Undergoing Diagnostic Laparoscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Todd R. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Lisa Keder
Affiliation:
Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus
Abimola Famuyide
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Kimberly S. Gecsi
Affiliation:
Medical College of Wisconsin
David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
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Summary

A 35-year-old nulligravid woman is scheduled to undergo diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of chronic pelvic pain. She describes her pain as sharp and stabbing that does wax and wane throughout the month but is always present. It is located in the pelvis and does not seem to be affected by bowel or bladder function. Her medical history is significant for ulcerative colitis and endometriosis. Her surgical history is significant for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, coloproctectomy with ileo J pouch creation, laparoscopic ablation of endometriosis, and total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Her coloproctectomy was complicated by postoperative peritonitis that necessitated a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics. She is not currently on any medications and has no known allergies.

Type
Chapter
Information
Surgical Gynecology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 159 - 161
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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