Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-75dct Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-30T08:18:01.728Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 10 - Early pregnancy loss

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2010

Gab Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash IVF, Melbourne, Australia
Get access

Summary

Among married women in the USA, 4% have experienced two clinical pregnancy losses and 3% three. The frequency of losses in human preimplantation embryos is very high. Of morphologically normal embryos, approximately 25-50% show chromosomal abnormalities, depending on maternal age. Luteal phase deficiency (LPD) has long been hypothesized, specifically due to inadequate progesterone secreted by the corpus luteum. Decreased conception rates and increased fetal losses are logically associated with overt hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Only women with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus have increased risk for fetal loss. Leiomyomas plausibly could cause early pregnancy loss, but analogous to Müllerian fusion anomalies the coexistence of uterine leiomyomas and reproductive losses need not necessarily imply a causal relationship. An association between second- and third-trimester pregnancy loss and acquired thrombophilias is accepted, but the role thrombophilias play in first-trimester losses is less certain.
Type
Chapter
Information
The Subfertility Handbook
A Clinician's Guide
, pp. 112 - 122
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×