Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-6vg6l Total loading time: 1.545 Render date: 2022-12-03T14:12:15.405Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 2 - Sensory abnormalites

from Section 1 - Clinical manifestations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2012

Louis R. Caplan
Affiliation:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston
Jan van Gijn
Affiliation:
University Medical Center, Utrecht
Get access

Summary

The primary function of the sensory cortex is to discriminate sensation: appreciation and recognition of spatial relations, appreciation of similarity and differences of external objects, precise localization of the point touched, and identification of objects (stereognosis). Although less carefully examined than motor or speech abnormalities, somatosensory abnormality is present in at least half of stroke patients. The sensory abnormality is characterized by the presence of paresthesias and a selective loss of lemniscal sensation. Pontine tegmental strokes affecting the sensory tracts are often accompanied by sensory symptoms. Concomitant involvement of the adjacent pyramidal tract results in a sensory-motor stroke, and additional involvement of the cerebellothalamic fibers at the ventrolateral nucleus may produce a hypesthetic ataxic hemiparesis syndrome. Although motor symptoms are usually dominant in patients with subcortical strokes, small or even relatively large lesions primarily affecting the thalamocortical sensory radiation can result in pure or predominant sensory symptoms.
Type
Chapter
Information
Stroke Syndromes, 3ed , pp. 11 - 20
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×