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The Third Violet (1897)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

George Monteiro
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
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Summary

“Book Notices.” Bachelor of Arts 4 (May 1897), p. 511

The author of The Red Badge, The Little Regiment, and Maggie, in this summer story applies his heavy, realistic system to a light, silly love tale. His intense style, extraordinary use of English, and thundering adjectives are here out of place. The book is dull, and the flirtation a piece of idle vacuousness. The girl throws three violets, and is won at last in a hopeless sort of confusion—for the reader. “Oh, do go—go! Please! I want you to go!” This in Cranese is the girl's method of gently saying, “I love you.” Hawker, the crack-brained lover, says, “What?” to this, springs to his feet, and explodes with delight. Crane is out of his element; his conceits of style do not sound so well in light, trifling comedy.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 16, 1897, p. 16

Stephen Crane's most recent story, “The Third Violet” (D. Appleton & Co.), should convince its author that a love story cannot be told in the matter of fact manner in which he would describe the episodes of a battlefield or the life of the streets and the tenements on the east side. Yet, this is just what Mr. Crane has attempted in this new novel. Apparently his idea was that a report of the conversations between a pair of lovers, an account of their actions, the inconsequent talk that flowed from the people about them, the things they did and what they said to other people or which other people said about them—all told just as it actually happened, would form an interesting compilation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Stephen Crane
The Contemporary Reviews
, pp. 143 - 160
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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References

New York Daily Tribune, May 16, 1897, part 3, p. 2.
Manchester Guardian, May 18, 1897, p. 4.
“New Books.” New York Sun, May 22, 1897, p. 7.
“New American Fiction.” New York Times (May 22, 1897), p. BR5.
S[horter], C[lement] K.. “Literature.” Illustrated London News 110 (May 29, 1897), p. 739.Google Scholar
“Literary Notices.” Hartford Courant, June 1, 1897, p. 7.
“Stephen Crane Essays Love.” New York Press, June 6, 1897, p. 20.
Letters and Art: Stephen Crane's New Story.” Literary Digest 15 (June 19, 1897), p. 218.
Waugh, Arthur. “London Letter.” Critic 30 (June 26, 1897), p. 442.Google Scholar
New York Herald, June 26, 1897, p. 13.
Lee, Gerald Stanley. “Of Mr. Stephen Crane.” Book Buyer 14 (July 1897), pp. 609–610.Google Scholar
Literary World (July 9, 1897).
Leeds Mercury, August 2, 1897.

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