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12 - In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation

from Part 4 - Trophoblast, amniotic fluid, endometrium, and bone marrow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2013

Carlos Simón
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Antonio Pellicer
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Renee Reijo Pera
Affiliation:
Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine
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Summary

Hematopoietic stem-cell disorders such as sickle cell disease, thalassemias, and immunodeficiencies may be the most amenable diseases to consider for in utero treatment. Despite the theoretical advantages of in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) and its success in animal models, its efficacy in humans has been limited, and current research efforts are focused on understanding and surmounting the barriers to engraftment in the fetus. The observation that selective depletion of host hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prior to bone-marrow (BM) transplant results in high rates of engraftment in adult animals suggests that vacating host stem cell niches may improve chimerism after IUHCTx. Two recent studies in mice have implicated the maternal immune system in rejecting the in utero transplanted cells, and have rekindled enthusiasm in this field. Achieving donor-specific tolerance after IUHCTx has the potential to treat many hematopoietic disorders.
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Chapter
Information
Stem Cells in Reproductive Medicine
Basic Science and Therapeutic Potential
, pp. 133 - 139
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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