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4 - Confucian Speech and Its Challenge to the Western Theory of Deliberative Democracy

from Part II - Dewesternizing Tendencies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 November 2017

Monroe Price
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Nicole Stremlau
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
Speech and Society in Turbulent Times
Freedom of Expression in Comparative Perspective
, pp. 59 - 78
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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