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9 - Conserving Island Species

Journey to Recovery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2018

Jamieson A. Copsey
Affiliation:
IUCN Conservation Planning Specialist Group (CPSG)
Simon A. Black
Affiliation:
Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology at the University of Kent
Jim J. Groombridge
Affiliation:
Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology at the University of Kent
Carl G. Jones
Affiliation:
Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
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Type
Chapter
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Species Conservation
Lessons from Islands
, pp. 255 - 290
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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