Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-t4qhp Total loading time: 0.342 Render date: 2022-08-09T21:27:10.318Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Conclusion

Rhythm Is Our Business

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2019

Melissa Tyler
Affiliation:
University of Essex
Get access

Summary

The preceding chapters have argued that Soho’s distinctive history and location, its architectural character and its spatial layout dynamically combine to make it the workplace that it is. Its rhythms are less a pause in the flows of traffic, people and capital in the spaces that surround it and more a change of tempo – its constant resurgence and reinvention characteristic of its past, present and, no doubt, its future. The grand commercial thoroughfares of Oxford Street and Regent Street and the theatre districts of Leicester Square and Shaftesbury Avenue have, throughout their existence, backed onto Soho’s narrow streets and alleyways. The latter have provided the sites of production for these commercial front stages, and they have endured as an escape from their conventional pleasures and performative pressures. The rush of public transport that surrounds Soho has never cut through its streets, many of which remain largely pedestrian or relatively inaccessible to fast-moving traffic.

Type
Chapter
Information
Soho at Work
Pleasure and Place in Contemporary London
, pp. 183 - 191
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Conclusion
  • Melissa Tyler, University of Essex
  • Book: Soho at Work
  • Online publication: 05 December 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316875704.007
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Conclusion
  • Melissa Tyler, University of Essex
  • Book: Soho at Work
  • Online publication: 05 December 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316875704.007
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Melissa Tyler, University of Essex
  • Book: Soho at Work
  • Online publication: 05 December 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316875704.007
Available formats
×